Luke Haynes

Luke Haynes

Virginia Wilcox

The designer Luke Haynes found inspiration from the minimalist artist Donald Judd’s work, 100 untitled works in mill aluminum, 1982-1986, which is installed in two former Army artillery sheds in Marfa, Texas. Each of Judd’s works is made of the same material in the same outer dimensions, but each has a unique interior. Likewise, Haynes created 50 Log Cabin quilts that all share the same materials and size, but each has a unique graphic arrangement.

Haynes’s minimal palette of black and white, with points of red, sharply articulates the graphic variations. By using repurposed clothing and household fabric, he textured the quilts with the inherent evidence of those who once used the cloth. To counter prejudices against quilts, Haynes conceived his work as what he calls “inhabitable sculpture.”

The environment-like installation of Log Cabins by Luke Haynes occupies a space that integrates quilts, sculpture and architecture. It is, further, a metamorphosis

About Luke Haynes

Biography

Biography
Luke Haynes
Biography

Subverting the traditional quilting form by integrating modern concepts, Luke Haynes transforms the comfortably familiar into the visually evocative. He continues to experiment with quilting while exploring art and architecture across the globe.

Haynes received his formal training in art and architecture at Cooper Union, New York. A chance encounter with a box of fabric remnants sparked his foray into quiltmaking. His first quilt, meas

5 Questions with Luke

5 Questions with Luke
5 Questions with Luke
Subverting the traditional quilting form by integrating modern concepts, Luke Haynes transforms the comfortably familiar into the visually evocative. He continues to experiment with quilting while exploring art and architecture across the globe. Haynes received his formal training in art and architecture at Cooper Union, New York. A chance encounter with a box of fabric remnants sparked his foray into quiltmaking. His first quilt, meas

Workshop with the Artist

Workshop with the Artist
Workshop with the Artist
Subverting the traditional quilting form by integrating modern concepts, Luke Haynes transforms the comfortably familiar into the visually evocative. He continues to experiment with quilting while exploring art and architecture across the globe. Haynes received his formal training in art and architecture at Cooper Union, New York. A chance encounter with a box of fabric remnants sparked his foray into quiltmaking. His first quilt, meas

Behind the Scenes Video

Behind the Scenes Video
Behind the Scenes Video
Subverting the traditional quilting form by integrating modern concepts, Luke Haynes transforms the comfortably familiar into the visually evocative. He continues to experiment with quilting while exploring art and architecture across the globe. Haynes received his formal training in art and architecture at Cooper Union, New York. A chance encounter with a box of fabric remnants sparked his foray into quiltmaking. His first quilt, meas

Traditional Log Cabin Settings

Traditional Log Cabin Settings
Traditional Log Cabin Settings
Subverting the traditional quilting form by integrating modern concepts, Luke Haynes transforms the comfortably familiar into the visually evocative. He continues to experiment with quilting while exploring art and architecture across the globe. Haynes received his formal training in art and architecture at Cooper Union, New York. A chance encounter with a box of fabric remnants sparked his foray into quiltmaking. His first quilt, meas

Artists Contact Info

Artists Contact Info
Artists Contact Info
Subverting the traditional quilting form by integrating modern concepts, Luke Haynes transforms the comfortably familiar into the visually evocative. He continues to experiment with quilting while exploring art and architecture across the globe. Haynes received his formal training in art and architecture at Cooper Union, New York. A chance encounter with a box of fabric remnants sparked his foray into quiltmaking. His first quilt, meas
This exhibition was made possible through funding from the Nebraska Arts Council and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment. The Nebraska Arts Council, a state agency, has supported this exhibition through its matching grants program funded by the Nebraska Legislature and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment. Visit www.nebraskaartscouncil.org for more information.
Event Date
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 to Sunday, April 15, 2018